International Astronautical Congress IAC (2008): Glasgow UK

Space-related art from Atlantica mission

Sarah Jane Pell

Abstract

The league of New World has announced two forthcoming missions Atlantica I (2009) and II (2012). Under the leadership of Dennis Chamberland, the profile for expedition I has crews preparing for 80days of continuous undersea human habitation. On 01 May 2009 - all conditions permitting – three permanent crew will commence the longest undersea durational mission ever attempted in a custom-built facility called the Leviathan Habitat for submersion off the coast of Florida. Expedition II envisages a permanent undersea occupation of 12 people occupying the Challenger Station habitat as the world’s largest undersea habitat and first undersea human community. Atlantica synchronises with the many post 2004 US Vision for Space Exploration missions. The potential knowledge transfer of these missions is timely. Atlantica provides an opportunity for testing innovative social, political and human models towards the permanent colonisation of non-terrestrial spaces for instance. By referencing prior Antarctica and International Space Station art, the mission requirements of Atlantica can employ best practice, new technology and innovative concepts beyond exploration toward occupation at a much reduced risk and cost to current benchmarks whilst significantly furthering undersea and space-related priorities. The timeliness of the precursor expedition (I) towards permanent undersea colonisation (II), also enable the team to test, develop and refine strategies, tools and principals for the communication, dissemination and articulation of extreme environment missions and their conceptualisations. For instance, an international crew of 24 people will rotate in five day visits to support the core aquanauts and service the wider objectives of the project. This team includes experienced scientists, engineers, astronauts, aquanauts, educators, filmmakers and an artist intent on actively engaging the wider public in the project. As Atlantica’s first artist/Aquanaut crewmember, the author will present five artistic strategies adapting new technologies for interfacing with, and extending the human experience of Atlantica. These strategies will focus on the directive to promote the responsible stewardship of the environment through the use of clean, autonomous life supports, responsible collaboration, infrastructures and systems development. The artist/Aquanaut will also provide examples of prior extreme environment artistic research and its various modes of publication, exhibition, broadcast and outreach. This presentation posits the Atlantica mission as an innovative platform for discussing new educational and outreach strategies as an analogue to future outer space habitat missions. The intention is to best prepare, and inspire, the imaginations of new audiences, and therefore new contributors, towards habitation of non-terrestrial spaces.

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This paper (IAC-08.E5.I.7) was presented during the 59th IAC in Glasgow, UK. 19th Symposium on Space-Related Activitiy and Society (E5) Interactive Session (1)

Copyright © 2008 International Astronautical Federation www.iafastro.org. All rights reserved.

Designing a dynamic utopia of our future in space.

Sarah Jane Pell

Abstract

With the many varied missions heralding from the 2004 US Vision for Space Exploration, the call to recognize the ethical, political and societal implications of such ambitions is a latent yet omnipresent challenge for the general public. Considering this period in history as a renewed opportunity for architecting superior systems and infrastructures, technologies, philosophies and laws than that of our current Earth-based supports, this paper explores the kind of framework that humanity will need to manage the responsibilities of many, concurrent lunar mission ambitions and the practical stepping-stones to best prepare for a successful future in space. The 2006 Luna Gaia: closed loop habitat for the Moon ISU/NASA Ames study recommended the establishment of an International Scientific Working Group (ISWG) for all future space activities and an Inter-governmental Protections Taskforce (IGPT) for the Earth-based management of these jurisdictions. By discussing these methods as case-study solutions which propose to align exploration infrastructures, scientific agendas, cultural sensitivities, commercial interests, time lines and the visions driving them, each concept is critiqued in terms of the capability for innovative societal, political and ethical modality towards a dynamic utopia. The purpose is to introduce the theory, requirements and societal-design concepts for systems in extreme and special environments, including outer space and its conceptualisations, towards a philosophy that enables humankind, and its policy makers, to garner new insights and knowledge for mission planning and wider reaching solutions to terrestrial concerns. "To ensure the fruits of all space exploration, science and discovery are directed an ethically appropriate and considered manner for the ’common heritage of mankind’, we must examine the motivations and hesitations of the individuals and states involved in space activities as well as those on the peripheries of space: particularly nations without the capital to participate and benefit first-hand. Particular attention must be paid to these matters at the outset in order to plan effectively." Luna Gaia, 2006.

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This paper (IAC-08.D3.1.8) was presented during the 59th IAC in Glasgow, UK. Symposium on Stepping Stones to the future: Strategies, architectures, concepts and technologies (D3) STRATEGIES AND ARCHITECTURES TO ESTABLISH A “STEPPING STONE” APPROACH TO OUR FUTURE IN SPACE (1)

Copyright © 2008 International Astronautical Federation www.iafastro.org. All rights reserved.

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